Ontario Visual Heritage Project

Introduction

Simcoe's Plan

War of 1812

Moravians

Baldoon Mystery

A Place of Refuge

Dresden

Elgin Settlement

Talbot Road

Bothwell's Boom

Civil War

Conclusion

Chatham-Kent Museum

Wallaceburg Museum

The swamp in which the Scots found themselves was known worldwide. The incessant rain, combined with mosquito-infested marshes and the noxious vapors of decaying matters proved insurmountable for the travel weary settlers. McDonald regretfully reported to Selkirk in 1804, that 22 of the original settlers had died and more were likely to follow.

From the beginning this foul place was known as a place of refuge. In the coming years, the growing republic to the south and the crumbling empire to the east would force the immigration of enterprising individuals seeking a safe haven. This unassuming part of Southern Ontario would come to be known as Chatham-Kent.

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Page 1: Introduction